New York State Police

The New York State Police was founded on April 11, 1917 in response to an outcry from a lack of policing in rural areas of the state. The first of the original 237 officers and men began training at a National Guard Camp in Manlius, New York.

The NYSP's first Superintendent George F.Chandler M.D., christened the training facility Camp Newayo, in honor of Ms. Newell and Ms. Mayo, the two Westchester County women who advocated so ardently and are credited for the impetus to form the NYSP. Although established initially as a mounted police force, the State Police quickly realized the value of the automobile.

In 1918 they added Model T Fords to their equipment and also purchased three motorcycles per Troop. Enforcement of vehicle and traffic laws became an increasingly important part of the Troopers' duties. Troopers gradually assumed more responsibility for vehicle and traffic safety, taking over all motor vehicle enforcement from the Motor Vehicle Bureau in 1926. Seventeen men were added to each Troop because of the new duties, bringing the authorized strength to 584, more than double the original complement.

In 1928, the State Police began policing the parks and parkways on Long Island for the first time, the beginning of what came to be informally known as "Troop L." The number of automobiles and motorcycles also increased and, in 1929, 112 Troopers on motorcycles were assigned full time to traffic enforcement duty. During the 1930s vehicle and traffic enforcement became an increasingly important part of the Troopers' duties.

In 1937, the first Traffic Bureau was established. It was in 1937, too, that the first formal course in Vehicle and Traffic enforcement was included in the curriculum of the State Police School. Although mounted patrols would continue throughout the decade, the number of miles covered on horseback would steadily decline and, in 1935, would fall below 50,000 miles for the first time in the History of the Division. In 1934, the first Diving Unit was established, and a Truck and Bus Squad was created to enforce commercial vehicle laws and check for overloaded trucks.

The end of World War II and the resurgence of highway traffic tolled the death knell for one of the oldest State Police traditions, as well. Mounted patrol miles had declined steadily throughout the 1930s and early 1940s. In 1947, only 2,115 miles were patrolled on horseback, less than 1/100th of the number 30 years before. In 1948, for the first time in its History, the New York State Police did not report any mounted patrols. Another major change was the opening, in 1954, of the New York State Thruway.

The New York State Police assumed sole responsibility for policing the Thruway and its authorized strength was increased from 899 to 1201 members in 1953 in order to provide the additional Thruway patrols. Troop cars also got a new look. In 1955 the gray patrol cars were replaced by new black and whites. In the same year patrol cars on the Thruway were painted blue and cream and, for the first time, had sirens and flashing red lights installed on the roof.

Three new Troops were authorized. The Thruway Detail was officially designated Troop T in 1961. In 1967, Troop E began operating from its new headquarters in Canandaigua, and Troop F began operations the following year. On January 1, 1980, the New York State Police took over responsibility for policing the Long Island Parkway and three shorter parkways upstate. The Parkway Police who were providing these services were absorbed into the New York State Police. Troop L Headquarters relocated from Islip Terrace to a new Headquarters Facility in Farmingdale.

In addition to direct police services, the New York State Police developed a wide range of sophisticated investigative and support services during the 1980s that are available to law enforcement agencies across the State to assist them in their police activities. These include Violent Criminal Investigative Services, computerized databases and analyses, forensic laboratory services, access to specialists in forensic sciences, mobile response teams and training. These are provided in addition to services established in earlier decades such as Hazardous Materials Specialists, Canine Units, Aviation and divers.

The New York State Police continues its tradition of cooperating with, assisting and supporting local and county law enforcement agencies across the Empire State. .

New York State Flag

Emblazoned on a dark blue field is the state coat of arms.
The goddess Liberty holds a pole with a Liberty Cap on top.
Liberty stands for freedom. At her feet is a discarded crown,
representing freedom from England at the end of the
revolutionary war. On the right is the goddess, Justice.
She wears a blindfold and carries the scales of justice.
Meaning that everyone receives equal treatment under the law.
The state motto "Excelsior" on a white ribbon expresses
the idea of reaching upward to higher goals.
On the shield a sun rises over the Hudson highlands
and ships sail the Hudson river. Above the shield is an
eagle resting on a globe representing the Western Hemisphere.

Early photographs from circa 1920 have shown what appears to be a flat-painted sign with the words N.Y. STATE over POLICE hung over the radiator of an open touring car. This sign was used in addition to a standard contemporary New York passenger license plate. It is not generally believed that these titled signs were a general issue as other patrol cars seen in similar photographs only bear the regular passenger license plates which were all numerical in the 123-123 format. This would indicate no special reserved series for the NYSP until at least 1928. The "sign plate" was dropped until the early 1930's where a similar sign plate was used in conjunction with the reserved series passenger plates as seen in the 1937 on-duty photo shown below. These were confirmed use at Troop K's Fishkill Post, but it is unknown if they were in wide use elsewhere in the state at that time.
License plates used in New York and by the New York State Police have always been and are still issued in pairs.

Grille Plate also used for vehicle identification

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over Olive Green

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over Maroon

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over Black

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
Black over Light Green NYSP License
plate numbers 675-327, 730-145,
730-501 and 730-844 confirmed

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over Midnight Blue

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over Emerald Green


Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over Purple

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over French Gray

Embossed Steel 16" x 6 1/4" -
Black over yellow with unpainted border

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
White over Dark Blue

Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
Blue over Yellow
 
As early as 1928, NYSP patrol cars were using special reserved low-numbered character-coded license plates. This was at a time where the sense of prestige among elected state officials leaned towards showing their "clout" with a nice low-numbered license plate instead of the more crowded looking number-and-letter plates that were the norm at that time. The photographic evidence indicates the introduction of reserved number passenger license plates for NYSP patrol vehicles at this time.
1928: Embossed Steel 16 1/8" x 6" -
Deep Yellow over Black. #-## N Y 28 Unpainted border
NYSP license plate number 9-15 and 9-72 confirmed
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1929: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 3/8"-
Black over Deep Yellow. ### (no dash) N Y . 29
NYSP license plate number 928 and 939 confirmed
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1930: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. N Y 30 ##-##
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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It was around 1931 when it was noticed that the reserved low-numbered character coded license plates were assigned by Troop. Troop A was assigned the 10-00 group. Most period photographs seen from this time have been from Troop A and thus mostly having numbers with the 10-## format . It is unknown as to whether this was just coincidence or that there was some order to this as Troop L had patrol cars
running 11-## license plates by 1932.
 
1932: Embossed Steel 13 5/8" x 6 3/8"
Deep Yellow over Black. N Y 32
##-## NYSP license plate number 11-93 and 11-98 confirmed
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1933: Embossed Steel 13 5/8" x 6 3/8"
Black over Deep Yellow. N Y 33 ##-##
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1934: Embossed Steel 13 5/8" x 6 3/8"
Deep Yellow over Black. ##-## N Y 34

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1935: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. ##-## N Y 35
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1936: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. N Y 36 ##-##
NYSP license plate number 10-73 confirmed
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1937: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. N Y 37 ##-##
Photo shows re-introduction of titled STATE POLICE
sign plate on opposite fender.

Courtesy of Dan Coviello



1938: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. N.Y. 38 ##-## NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1939

Picture courtesy of Norman Rhoades

1939: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1939 ##-##
1940: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. ##-## NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1940
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1941: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. ##-## N Y 41

Photo Courtesy of Sgt. Al Kurek (New York State Police, Ret.)

1942: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. N Y 42 ##-##
NOTE: There is speculation that due to metal preservation during the war effort at the time, that the NYSP may have continued to use its 1941 license plates into 1945 as there has been no record to show that they continued with annual issues during this time. All license plates in New York during 1943 issued a black over deep yellow embossed steel tab with N Y 43 to be attached over the N Y 42 of the 1942 issue.
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1944: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. N Y - 44 ##-##
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1945: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. N Y 45 ##-##
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1946: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. ##-## N Y 46
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1947: Embossed Steel 13 5/8" x 6 3/8"
Deep Yellow over Black. ##-## N Y 47

<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1948: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. N Y 48 ##-##
NYSP license plate number 12-30 also confirmed

Courtesy of Kevin Kailbourne - NYSP (Ret)
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1949
In 1949, a 3 1/4" x 1 5/8" embossed metal tab in
Deep Yellow over Black was used to validate the 1948 plate.
It is not certain if NYSP subscribed to this issuance.
<PICTURE NEEDED>

1950: Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. N Y 50 ##-##

Courtesy of Jim Schaller
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1951
Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. ##-## NY-THE EMPIRE STATE 51
NOTE: Confirmed numbers for the following:
10-95 on a Troop A car. 11-64 on a Troop D car.
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1952
In 1952, a 2/1/2" x 2" embossed metal tab in Deep Yellow over
Black was used to validate the 1951 plate.
It is not certain if NYSP subscribed to this issuance.
NOTE: Confirmed numbers for 12-26 and 20-35 at Troop K (Ellenville)
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1953
Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Deep Yellow over Black. ##-## NY-THE EMPIRE STATE 53 NYSP license plate number 10-46 confirmed Troop A (Lewiston)
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1954
In 1954, a 2/1/2" x 2" embossed metal tab in Black over
Deep Yellow was used to validate the 1953 plate.
It is not certain if NYSP subscribed to this issuance.
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1955
Embossed Steel 13 1/2" x 6 1/4"
Black over Deep Yellow. NY-THE EMPIRE STATE 55 ##-##
<PICTURE NEEDED>
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1956
In 1956, a 2/1/2" x 2" embossed metal tab in Deep
Yellow over Black was used to validate the 1955 plate.
It is not certain if NYSP subscribed to this issuance.
1957 saw the introduction of the 6" x 12" standardized format in embossed steel with a DSP (Division of State Police) prefix ahead of 3 numbers.
This formatting lasted until 1968, but used until the end of 1971.


1957
First issue DSP (Division of State Police) prefixed plate.
Experimental REFLECTIVE
Deep Yellow over Black. DSP-### NY EMPIRE STATE 57
NOTE: At the end of 1957, these plates were removed from the patrol
vehicles and returned to the Commissioner of Motor vehicles in Albany
for examination. The examination was to determine the durability of the
glass bead reflective material used on the raised characters of the plate. Extreme weather conditions, road salt in the winter and regular "battle
wear" took their toll on this material, and reflective license plates did not
get used again by the NYSP until sixteen years later.
It is generally believed that Troop A received the lower numbers
(including 2 digit) followed by Troop B and so on for this series
of license plates until the 1968 issue.
Courtesy of Peter Kanze



Pictures courtesy of the New York State Police

1958
Black over Deep Yellow. DSP-### NY EMPIRE STATE 58

1959
In 1959, a 2/1/2" x 2" embossed metal tab in
Deep Yellow over Black was used to validate the 1958 plate.
Rear plate only.
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1960
Deep Yellow over Black.
DSP-### NY EMPIRE STATE 60
<PICTURE NEEDED>

1961
In 1961, a 2/1/2" x 2" embossed metal tab in
Black over Deep Yellow was used to validate the 1960 plate.
Rear plate only.
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this type plate on duty....
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1962: Black over Deep Yellow.
DSP-### NY EMPIRE STATE 62
Plate from the Robert Ward Collection
1963
In 1963, a 2/1/2" x 2" embossed metal tab in
Deep Yellow over Black was used to validate the 1962 plate.
Rear plate only.
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this type plate on duty....
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1964
Deep Yellow over Black.
DSP-### NY WORLD'S FAIR 64
NOTE: It has been said that these plates were run rear only
with no plate run on the front of the patrol vehicle.
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this type plate on duty....
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1965
In 1965, a 3 5/8' x 1/2" decal in Black over Reflective
Red was used to validate the 1964 plate.
NOTE: It has been said that these plates were run rear only with
no plate displayed on the front of the patrol vehicle
.
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this type plate on duty....
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1966
Orange over Blue. DSP-### NEW YORK and decal navel.
Validated with Red over Reflective White 12/66 decal on rear plate only.

1967
Orange over Blue. DSP-### NEW YORK and decal navel.
Validated with Green over Reflective Yellow 1/67 decal on rear plate only.

1968-1973 issue-

Courtesy of Paul Hasselmann (NYSP Retired)

1969 issue
1968: In mid-1968 the NYSP had noticed that the DSP numbers were nearing their capacity. To ensure a less-restrictive way of identifying their vehicles, the NYSP unveiled a new "Troop plate" introduced in December of 1968. The plate was the same color and material as the 1966 DSP plates, but along the bottom of the plate it read: NY STATE POLICE NY A 4 to 5 digit number was used with each 1000 bloc dedicated to a particular Troop.
1000 bloc: Troop A covering the counties of Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming
2000 bloc: Troop B covering the counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton and St. Lawrence
3000 bloc: Troop C covering the counties of Broome, Chenango, Cortland, Delaware, Otsego, Tioga and Tompkins
4000 bloc: Troop D covering the counties of Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga and Oswego
5000 bloc: Troop E covering the counties of Cayuga, Chemung, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Wayne and Yates
6000 bloc: Troop F covering the counties of Greene, Orange, Rockland, Sullivan and Ulster
7000 bloc: Troop T covering the New York State Thruway
8000 bloc: Troop G covering the counties of Albany, Fulton, Hamilton, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Warren and Washington
9000 bloc: Troop K covering the counties of Columbia, Dutchess, Putnam and Westchester
10-000 bloc: Troop L covering the counties of Nassau and Suffolk
NEW YORK SPECIAL PROJECT LICENSE PLATES
As the NYSP was using the contemporary DSP and Troop plates on their patrol vehicles during this time, some NYSP patrol cars were selected to run special project test plates issued by the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles. These test plates were run on the front of selected NYSP and other state vehicles from as early as January of 1967 and as late as June of 1971. The plates were of the same color and layout as the 1966 base plates in use by the state at the time. The registration number was replaced with the word STATE and the state name was replaced with the word TEST PLATE. It is believed that although no reflective material was used on the plates (as with the 1957 experiment), that the paint itself was being tested to determine durability under the most trying conditions.

Special Project Test Plates.
It is believed that the stacked numbers on the decals to the
left of the bottom plate were a code for the paint sample
used on that particular plate.
Courtesy of Peter Kanze


1968
Orange over Blue. DSP-### NEW YORK and decal navel.
Validated with Blue over Reflective White 1/68 decal on rear plate only.
Used by Headquarters and older vehicles in the NYSP fleet concurrent
with 1968-issue NYSP Troop plates
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1969
Orange over Blue. DSP-### NEW YORK and decal navel.
Validated with Red over Reflective Yellow 1/69 decal on rear plate only.
Used by Headquarters and older vehicles in the NYSP fleet concurrent
with 1968-issue NYSP Troop plates.
Courtesy of Peter Kanze
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this type plate on duty....
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1970
Orange over Blue. DSP-### NEW YORK and decal navel.
Validated with Black over Reflective White 1/70 decal on rear plate only.
Used by Headquarters and older vehicles in the NYSP fleet concurrent
with 1968-issue NYSP Troop plates
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this type plate on duty....
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1971
Orange over Blue. DSP-### NEW YORK and decal navel.
Validated with Black over Reflective Orange 1/71 decal on rear plate only.
Used by Headquarters and older vehicles in the NYSP fleet concurrent
with 1968-issue NYSP Troop plates
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By 1972, the entire NYSP fleet was utilizing the titled Troop plates that were introduced in 1968.

1968-1973 issue- 6000 series= Troop F.
Although this particular plate which was attached to the
restored NYSP 1972 Plymouth shown in the adjoining
photo is a reproduction, it was created from a photograph
of a period-used plate. The color, layout and even die-type
is identical to the original, with the only detraction being
that this plate is made of thin aluminum as opposed to the
embossed steel that would have been used at that time.

Restored 1972 Plymouth Fury I
operated by Yan Salomon- NYSP
By late 1973, New York went to a blue over reflective orange license plate. The NYSP followed suit and continued using the Troop plate designations introduced on the 1968-1972 base plate. This issue was utilized until 1984.

1973-1984 issue- 1000 series= Troop A (Batavia)
Plate from the Robert Ward Collection

Troop G car 31- Photo Courtesy of Monty McCord

1973-1984 issue- 10 = Long Island Troop
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In September of 1984, NYSP license plates went back to the 1966 format with the state name on the bottom of the plate followed by a validation decal navel in the bottom right corner. The "STATE POLICE" monicker was dropped and the letters DSP for "Division of State Police" re-appeared as a prefix on the left side of the plate in an oblique to the right. A zone number then preceded the Troop letter followed by a dash and the car/radio number.
Troop A Headquartered in Batavia
Troop B Headquartered in Malone
Troop C Headquartered in Sidney
Troop D Headquartered in Oneida
Troop E Headquartered in Canadaigua
Troop F Headquartered in Middletown
Troop G Headquartered in Loudonville
Troop H Headquartered at General HQ- Albany
Troop K Headquartered in Poughkeepsie
Troop L Headquartered in Long Island
Troop M Headquartered in Manhattan (Detective office- later renamed Troop NYC)
Troop T Headquartered in Albany for the New York State Thruway

1984-1986 issue- Troop L (Long Island)
Car/Radio Call Number 31
The same plate that is on the Trooper car to the right!



1984-1986 issue-
Troop T = Thruway Zone 2- Car 81
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1984-1986 issue- Sample
Courtesy of Marco Tramelli
 
In 1986, New York went to a graphic license plate depicting the Statue of Liberty. The plates have been known in the hobby as the "Liberty base". The plate was made of galvanized steel with embossed numerals. A silkscreened horizontal line in red spanned the length of the plate above the upper mounting holes and another such line spanned the length of the plate below the lower mounting holes. The state name was silkscreened in dark blue upper case font between the two upper mounting holes. The graphic of the Statue of Liberty is situated at the far left of the plate as a prelude to the registration number.
The earlier versions of these plates all utilized the dash to separate the Troop letter from the car/radio number, but in 1988 and after, many were made without the dash.

1986-1994 issue- Zone 2 Troop F (Middletown)
Car/Radio Call Number 4

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1986-1994 issue.
Emergency Vehicle Operators Course- Car 8. These plates are used on
Academy pursuit vehicles for the intensive EVOC training
as outlined at this link:

http://www.troopers.state.ny.us/academy/EVOC/

Picture courtesy of Jay Weinstein

1986-1994 issue.
1988 version with no dash.
Troop E- Canadaigua, Zone 1 car 80

Troop D- Oneida, Zone 2 car 87 (no dash: 1988) issue-
Photo courtesy of Jay Weinstein

1986-1994 issue- Sample

Courtesy of Larry Austin- NYSP (Ret)
 

By late 1994/early1995, the NYSP began using very distinctive all-graphic license plates. The plates were made with technology provided by a German company based out of New Jersey called Azon-Utsch. This company spearheaded the advancement of "thermo-transfer print" digital technology for license plate manufacturing in the USA: a digital means of applying license numbers to license plates without the need for the traditional stamping press. A sheet of reflective material comprised of the layout, format and license number was adhered to the aluminum base plate.

It was the beginning of "cut and paste" license plate manufacturing in North America. These plates were not just relegated to the exclusive use of the NYSP, but also for special-issue graphic and personalized license plates issued in New York State. These plates are all-screened and have no embossed characters. Only the contour of the plate is step-bordered. The design of this plate utilized a retro-reflective white base plate with a dark blue banner placed across the top of the plate with NEW YORK in a stylized font in white, similar to that used by the New York Yankees baseball organization.

Below that is a sliver of white showing horizontally across the plate followed by a thin red horizontal stripe that spans the length of the plate. Below that to the far left is a circular emblem depicting the New York coat-of arms and the words NEW YORK along the top of the circle and STATE POLICE along the bottom of the circle. To the immediate right of the emblem is the assignment number in dark blue "Zurich Extra Condensed" font. Between the lower mounting holes in dark blue is the line reading: STATE POLICE-Proudly Serving Since 1917. Below the lower mounting holes is the reverse order of the red, white and blue horizontal stripes.

The earliest rendition of these plates utilized what we call in layman's terms the "slashed zero" to differentiate the character from the letter "O". After several months of "legibility issues" on the road, a directive was sent from General Headquarters that all NYSP license plates with the "slashed zero" were to be returned to Albany for exchange with a "clean zero" substitute. All "slashed zero" license plates were to have subsequently been destroyed, but a few have been found to have escaped such a dire fate.


1995 issue.
Early "Slashed zero" type.
Troop L (Long Island) Zone 2, Car 20

Picture courtesy of Jay Weinstein

1995-Current issue. Later "Clean Zero" type.
Zone 1 Troop H (Headquarters) Car/Radio Number 60.
This plate was given to me by former NYSP Superintendent James W. McMahon whom I had the pleasure and honor of meeting and working with at the 108th IACP Conference held in Toronto, Ontario just one
month after the September 11th 2001 terrorist attacks.



1995-Current issue. Emergency Vehicle Operator's
Course vehicle from NYSP Academy.


Current issue
Low Speed crash simulator used to demonstrate
the importance of air bags and seat belt use
.
 

1995-Current Sample Number
 

Custom NYSP plate made for restored
1973 Plymouth Fury pictured to the right

Specially-made NYSP plate as a result of a friendly
indulgence by a DMV administrator (since retired) to have this
"one-off" type plate made for several investigators with the NYSP to be used as a "desk sign/door sign". The emblem is
much more colorful than the regular sanctioned NYSP plate.
Courtesy of Mark Scarselli

Magnets were affixed to ensure application to
metal surfaces, in this case, a desk.

Courtesy of Mark Scarselli
MOTORCYCLE LICENSE PLATES USED BY NEW YORK STATE POLICE

The NYSP used motorcycles for patrol since 1918 when horseback was still the principal means of duty transport. Three granite-grey motorcycles with sidecars were issued per Troop for four Troops at the time. Motorcycle use for patrol was from May until October in daylight and good weather only. Motorcycle training was conducted in Troy NY with a 5 day novice course and a one day refresher every Spring. Policy at the time was for two riders per cycle: a senior man and a relief rider, the latter only being used when the senior man was off or on other duty.

As for license plate usage for NYSP cycles, high-numbered civilian motorcycle license plates were used from the 1920's into the early 1930's, then low numbered ones from the late 1930's into the 1940's.
Confirmed NYSP numbers for NYSP motorcycles during this time:
1921: 21824
1939: 113
1940: 114
1945: 8860
More recently, NYSP motorcycles use smaller versions of the all-graphic NYSP plate, but bearing the prefix MC followed by up to two numbers. No known designation by Troop.


Motorcycle plate - Current Issue
We are looking for one of these for our
private collection. If you can help, please
drop Coop an e-mail

Special thanks to Sgt. Meyers - NYSP

SPECIAL ISSUE PERSONAL USE LICENSE PLATES FOR FORMER NYSP PERSONNEL

Around 2001, special personal use license plates were made available to former personnel of the NYSP who left the agency under honorable circumstances.


Older issue- Association of Former New York State
Troopers- personal use.
Courtesy of Larry Austin- NYSP (Ret)

Current issue- Association of Former New York State
Troopers- personal use

Courtesy of Larry Austin- NYSP (Ret)

Courtesy of Mark Scarselli

Embossed aluminum 90th Anniversary plate
 

Embossed aluminum promotional plate 1990's/2000's.
Courtesy of the John Yeaw Collection
 

Circa 1999 booster plate.
Grey background. Embossed thin aluminum